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The simple way that we create these in Elementor by placing our nav-menu widget in a popup, and in the popup’s conditions, set the trigger to On Click, and save. Then we add a button or icon on our page, or header. In the button/icon widget’s settings, we use the dynamic options to set the button’s action to Open Popup, and select the popup that we dedicated as our menu.

Closing the popup is, of course, something that we define in the popup’s settings, in the Elementor edit panel. This would be a good time to mention that if you’re using this style, make sure that the close icon or button is clear and easy to use, especially in responsive mode.

As you might have realised, all of these styles of navigation menu can be used both horizontally (across the screen, top or bottom), and vertically (down the side of the screen), equally.

There is of course a debate among UX experts as to whether or not vertical or side screen menus should be used. Those in favor of them, will point out that we use them all the time, we even have one in WordPress.

Those opposing side-screen menus, make a point that they are detrimental to mobile user experience.

However, there are some great uses of popup menus that slide in from the side in responsive mode. Unfortunately, they are also less fashionable these days. Though they still appear in sites that are designed to be viewed or scrolled through horizontally, like some portfolio sites.